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Posts Tagged ‘meaning’

Hello,

I usually keep love words for Valentine’s Day blog posts but romance shouldn’t be confined to a single day, should it?

I couldn’t resist the nugget of anatomical science which tells me that the oblique muscles of the eye used to move your glance sideways in an amorous way are called the amatorial muscles.

Now, before you check that detail I must warn you an online search for amatorial muscles will probably give you results for a different muscle used in amorous ways of a more, shall we say, physical nature. Search at your own peril!

Amatorial comes, of course, from the word amorous. I had an inkling that had Latin roots because I knew l’amour is the French for love and yes, the Latin word for love is amor and it reached English via French. I was hoping for a Roman god or goddess link but nope, it’s just love – both the romantic and the friendly sort. Simple but important.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling. If anybody ‘throws you the eye’, remember what muscle they’re using,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

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Hello,

This week I’ve dug out my Sherlock hat and taken on a missing persons case. The person in question is Janey Mac and while rumours of her being a Dublin girl like myself persist, it now appears Janey Mac may have been a man.

Janey Mac is an expression of surprise, originating in Ireland and dating back at least 50 years, probably much longer. Some claim it for the west of the country, others for Dublin, but it’s definitely from Ireland and has spread into other countries along with Irish emigrants. Janey Mac hasn’t made it into the dictionary, yet, but is under consideration.

Charmingly, Janey Mac comes with a rhyme

Janey Mac me shirt is black,
What’ll I do for Sunday?
Go to bed and cover your head,
And don’t get up till Monday.

There are three possible origins for Janey.

The first is she was a Dublin girl, one of a pair of sisters. Given that mac is a common prefix to Irish surnames (MacCarthy, MacCabe, MacAuley etc) thanks to mac meaning “son of” in Irish, you would expect to find a Janey MacCarthy (or other Mac surname) at the bottom of this but I couldn’t find a real surname or time period for her anywhere and why would a girl be so surprising anyhow?

The second is the exclamation is an avoidance of taking God’s name in vain. Instead of yelling “Jesus Christ” when you drop a hammer on your toe, you’d call out Janey Mac instead. This is possible. Some alternatives include jeez and “cheese and rice” and many parents in Ireland would say sugar instead of sh**, but Janey Mac really doesn’t sound like Jesus Christ. I’m not convinced by this.

The third option is intriguing and may be complete hokum but it’s a good story. Every Irish schoolchild has heard tales of Fionn MacCumhaill, the ancient Irish warrior (probably mythological). He’s our version of Hercules – super strong, amazing warrior, constantly having adventures and nearly dying. You could see how his surname could be shortened to Mac, right?

His first name, Fionn, was actually a nickname. It means blonde in Irish. Fair hair in the Irish population (pre-viking times) was pretty rare so it makes sense he’d get that as a nickname, just as those with red hair are now rare and might be called Red.

Fionn’s real first name was Deimne which in certain dialects is pronounced Janey.

When Christianity came to the island the first battle was against the ancient myths and stories of demi-gods. Saint Brigid was created to cover for an Irish goddess, it’s not beyond the bounds of belief to see Fionn MacCumhaill being transformed into Janey Mac and it being used as an exclamation or oath, over time becoming confused with those swearing by Jesus Christ.

The true origins of Janey Mac are unknown but I enjoyed the search for her. I love that a mythical Dublin lass may actually have been a mythical demi-god warrior.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

p.s. Thanks to Paddy PJ Callahan who suggested this topic for the blog.

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Hello and Happy May Day,

I’ve an extra fondness for May as it’s my birthday month and I wish this first of May had less rain hereabouts, but I’ve enjoyed learning about Irish May Day traditions this morning on twitter. Apparently the day is celebrated with bonfires. I don’t fancy my chances of lighting the fire pit in today’s driving rain. Maidens would go out and wash their faces in stream junctions to avoid sun-burn. I’d try, but sun-burn isn’t looking too scary right now. Finally, wildflowers were gathered and placed on doorsteps to avert evil spirits. Now that I can do.

Rainbow wildflowers on a doorstep

This week’s word is bumptious. I came across it in an interview with the author Deborah Moggach who used it to mean being intolerant in relationships. I hadn’t met it before and scurried to my dictionary. It told me that a bumptious person is unpleasantly confident, arrogant, and conceited. The example given was of a bumptious young man but I’m sure this can apply to all genders and ages.

Bumptious doesn’t have ancient roots. It first appeared in English around 1800 and is believed to be a wordplay on the words bump and fractious (quarrelsome). Bump is older though, possibly from Scandinavian origins. It joined English in the late 1500s with the meaning of a blow, or the sound of a blow. One variation was bumpsy which was slang for drunk and certainly provides an image of a bumptious drunk staggering around, bumping into things.

Until next time enjoy the May Day traditions and avoid being a bumptious bumpsy,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

p.s. I won my April CampNaNoWriMo challenge with 50 hours of editing.

 

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Hello,

This week I’m thinking about talking. My son is on his school’s debating team and they’re in a regional final on Saturday. This is no surprise to anybody who has ever met him. I prefer to express myself in writing but if I had a dollar for every time he opened his mouth, I’d be a rich woman.

Trophies for Talking

I’m driving him nuts by reminding him of the correct pronunciation of words he’s learned from reading so he doesn’t trip up in the debating contest. His English teacher pronounces hyperbole as it’s written but I explained it’s actually high-pear-bow-lee, much to his irritation.

Another word of that type (along with Hermione and anxiety which confused me when I was younger) is grandiloquentpronunciation here and I hope his speeches on Saturday avoid both hyperbole and grandiloquence.

Grandiloquent is a style of language use which is complicated in order to attract admiration and attention.

Grandiloquent entered English in the 16th century and is a word created from both Latin and English roots. Eloquence is the ability to speak fluidly, convincingly, and with grace and can apply in written text as well as the spoken word. Grandiloquus means grand-speaking in Latin and itself is formed from two other Latin words – grandis meaning grand and loqui meaning speak.

If you don’t mind being accused of grandiloquency (like delinquency, but you throw words rather than bricks) then check out the 40 Grandiloquent Words Starting with G – I’ll have to revisit some of these in future posts.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and grandiloquent wordfooling,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

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Hello,

This week’s word is jettatura (pronunciation here) which is a term for the evil eye or bad luck.

A glass token to avert jettatura

Jettatura entered English in the 1800s with the earliest use found in “The London Magazine”. The word originates in Italian, particularly in the southern regions, and is formed from iettare (to jinx or curse) and -atura.

What is jettaura or the evil eye? Accounts vary, as they often do for occult terms. In one version the person who is cursed with the evil eye will cast bad luck upon anybody they look at. This seems particularly unfair as you’re bound to curse those you love. The advice was to wear horns on your person to avert the curse.

The version I’ve encountered personally in the Greek islands and in Turkey (not a million miles away from southern Italy) is that anybody with blue eyes is deemed to carry the evil eye and may accidentally cause bad luck to those in their vicinity. This can be turned aside by a blue eyeball token (on your person or in your home) or by making the sign of horns with the fingers of your hands.

I have blue eyes and would sometimes find brown-eyed locals discreetly making the horn sign when they encountered me on the street or in marketplaces in the much the same habitual way my mother would make the sign of the cross when an ambulance passed us – partly to bless the efforts of the medical crew in helping the person inside and partly in hope that such trouble would bypass her and her family.

In Turkey particularly the glass eye tokens were everywhere and traders would sometimes slip one into my purchases either as an extra bonus or to ensure my blue-eyed jettatura went away with me rather than resting upon their business.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

 

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Hello,

These week’s word, oniochalasia, has been inspired by a prolonged shopping trip last Saturday. My daughter needed an outfit for a special occasion and she thoroughly enjoyed the experience of trying on and purchasing her new clothes. I hope I haven’t given her oniochalasia, it’s an expensive habit.

Book store oniochalasia

So what is it? Oniochalasia is the purchasing of objects as a form of mental relaxation, in other words, retail therapy. If you enjoy shopping, and the buzz of a good bargain, you may suffer from this. Alternatively your credit card may suffer from the aftermath.

Sadly I wasn’t able to source a sound file for the pronunciation of this word but one video gave it as “on-chill-a-laze-e-a”. Oniochalasia appears to be a recently invented word coined from Greek sources – onio is the Greek for sell or sale while chalasia is the relaxing of a ring of muscle. Combine the two and you get relaxation because of purchases.

My daughter was definitely relaxed after our trip to the dress shops, unfortunately my tired feet and credit card are still recovering. I can vouch for book-shopping as being my oniochalasia method of choice. I had the pleasure of spending a large stack of book vouchers recently and it had a relaxing effect, until I tried to add them to my already large To Be Read pile and everything fell over.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

 

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Hello,

It snowed here last night, a rare enough event on Ireland’s east coast, a scattering of the white stuff lies on the grass outside my house and the paths are icy. The temperature on the walk to school was low enough to convince me to postpone my daily walk until noon when it will hopefully be warmer. Instead I’ve retreated to my hibernacle.

My hibernacle, don’t you have one?

Mine consists of a soft purple blanket nest, a good book, and a large bar of quality chocolate.

My hibernacle

A hibernacle is “a place where an animal hibernates, but it can also mean a winter retreat for humans” according to The Free Dictionary.

Humans and hibernating animals have shared the history of hibernacle from the start. The word arose in New Latin from hibernaculum which means winter quarters or tents for winter. Animals don’t live in tents so clearly the origin is with winter shelter for humans. Soldiers or nomads would need a stronger, more snow-proof, shelter in winter than what’s required in warmer months. Of course here in Ireland you need something waterproof year-round.

By the 1690s hibernacle entered English in the animal biology sense, as a shelter for over-wintering animals. It has retained that sense to modern times but there’s a case for bringing back the human version too. Yes, we can’t hibernate but the appeal of curling up under a blanket with a box-set or good book is strong on snow-days.

If you don’t have a hibernacle, perhaps it’s time to create one?

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling in your hibernacle,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

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