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Posts Tagged ‘tornado word origin’

Hello,

There’s only one possible word I could explore today – hurricane. It’s noon here on the east coast of Ireland and we’re due to experience ex-hurricane Ophelia this afternoon and evening. Although we love to complain about the weather in this country we’re lucky enough to have a temperate climate and while the rainfall helps our green fields we generally avoid hurricanes, earthquakes, twisters, and wildfires.

Hurricane Ophelia Over Ireland

That means that today’s Red Weather Alert is the the worst weather event in this country in 50 years. We’re expecting gusts of up to 150km per hour and 22,000 homes in the south of the country are already without power. I’ve spent my morning storm-proofing our garden and gathering items like torches, batteries, camping cookers, and filling our water containers. My children’s schools are closed and they’re fretting about losing our wifi! Others are more laid-back. Two of my neighbours haven’t even removed the nets from their garden trampolines. Those will act as sails this afternoon, worrying.

Hurricane entered the English language in the 1500s from the Spanish word huracán. The Spanish were busy in the Caribbean at that time thanks to the golden age of sail. Huracán came from the Taino language where Hurakán was their god of evil. The Taino people were indigenous to the Caribbean and Florida. They borrowed the word from the Mayans who used it to name their god of wind, storm, and fire. Hurricane isn’t the only weather word we took from Spanish sources. They also gave us tornado which comes from tronado (thunderstorm) and tornar (to turn).

The god Hurakán sounds like a lovely chap. This one-legged creator god is sometimes depicted with a second serpent-like limb. According to legend he lived in the mists above the waters and by repeating the word “earth” he caused the land to arise. Unfortunately the humans angered the gods and he was equally happy to send a deluge to wash them away. The cycle of creation and eradication happened three times. He even sent a plague of dogs and turkeys at one point.

I am hoping we won’t have swarms of turkeys later today, but anything is possible. If you’re in Ireland, I hope you and yours are safe through this.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling (by torchlight!),

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

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