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Hello,

This week, after a wonderful weekend in Galway that included a little Lynch research on the side, it’s time to revisit the origin of the word lynch (explored in a 2014 post). This is an extract from my forthcoming non-fiction paperback and ebook “How To Get Your Name In The Dictionary” which rambles through the fascinating life stories of those who gave their names to the English language via eponyms.

(extract from “How To Get Your Name In The Dictionary” by Grace Tierney, c. 2018)

Lynch family crest, medieval stone carving, St. Nicolas’ church, Galway

The Irish origin of this word is somewhat questionable, but I suspect it has Irish roots somewhere, if only because Lynch is a common Irish surname.

Most of us know that to lynch someone is to punish them, typically by hanging, without the benefit of due legal process. The real mystery lies in working out who was the original Lynch.

The Irish claim to the word is based in Galway city. The story goes that in 1493 James Lynch Fitzstephen, the mayor of Galway, strung up his own son from the upstairs window of his house for murdering a young Spanish man over a romantic rivalry. There’s even a plaque at the window which you can see in Galway.

It’s a dramatic story and a great one for tourists but almost certainly false because the term didn’t gain usage for another 300 years. In fact the window with the plaque doesn’t even date from the correct period and is no longer in the original Lynch house.

Lynch Castle, Galway (now a bank)

 

A variation of the story is that the Lynch son embezzled money from his father’s merchant business overseas and covered it by throwing a Spaniard overboard on his return trip. A sailor denounced him on his death bed and his father, a local judge (and first mayor of Galway), condemned him to death. When the public gathered to prevent the hanging the father took matters into his own hands and hung his son from the house’s window.

The tomb of James Lynch, first mayor of Galway in St. Nicolas medieval church

It’s only fair to point out that second version does include a trial, although one wonders how fair it was.

The much more likely source for lynching (although nobody is 100% certain) is an American Quaker Charles Lynch (1736-1796), a planter in Virginia who held an irregular court to imprison loyalist supporters of Britain during the American War of Independence. Charles later got Lynch’s Law passed to excuse him from wrong-doing because it was war-time, a clever move.

The controversy around Lynch’s Law brought the word into common usage to indicate anything done without due legal process.

Although lynching later came to be associated with racial issues, Charles was known to be colour blind in his judgments.

Inhabitants of Lynchburg, Virginia will already know of their own connection to this tale, the town was founded by Charles’ older brother.

Added Bonus

When exploring the Lynch tombs in Galway I encountered a wordy stone-carved Latin tombstone, pictured here.

Tomb of Stephen Lynch, St. Nicolas’ church, Galway

The inscription translates as –

“Stephen Lynch of illustrious lineage, the darling of his soldiers and the terror of his enemies, in years still a young man, but old in valour, of whom the world was not worthy, was exalted to Heaven the 14th of March A.D. 1644”.

What a wonderful description, wish I could have one that good when I kick the bucket.

Wordfoolery is running away to Paris next week, so I’ll be skipping one post but will be back fooling with words on Monday 13th. Until then happy reading, writing, and wordfooling,

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

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Hello,

this week’s word and another entry in my eponym series is lynch and while most of us would know that to lynch someone is to punish them without bothering with a trial, the real mystery lies in discovering who Lynch was.

Lynch is a common Irish surname, so I suspected an Irish connection and came across a link to Galway. The story goes that in 1493 James Lynch Fitzstephen, the Mayor of Galway, strung up his own son from the upstairs window of his house for mudering a young Spanish man over a romantic rivalry. There’s even a plaque at the window which you can see in Galway.

A dramatic story, and a great one for tourists, but almost certainly false because the term didn’t become common for another three hundred years. In fact the window with the plaque doesn’t even date from the correct period and is no longer in the original Lynch house. You can see a photo of it and read an even more complex tale of the Galway lynching here.

The much more likely (although nobody is 100% sure) originator of the word is an American Quaker Charles Lynch (1736-1796), a planter in Virginia who held an irregular court to imprison Loyalist supporters of Britain during the American Revolution. He later got a law passed to excuse him from wrong-doing – called Lynch’s Law – because it was wartime. The controversy around this law brought the word into common usage to mean anything done without due legal process. Although lynching later came to be closely linked to racial issues, Charles himself was known to be “colour blind” in his judgements. Inhabitants of Lynchburg city, Virginia will probably already know of their connection to the story, Charles’ older brother founded the town.

Interested in the people behind the eponyms? Have a look at Boycott, Ferris, Guillotine, Wellington, and Jeremiad.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling,

Grace

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