Bosky Jewels, Throwing Shade, and Taking Umbrage

Hello,

Today’s word is from Wordfoolery friend, Sheena, a crossword fiend who stumbled upon bosky when looking up umbrageous. That sentence sent me scurrying for my dictionary. Well played, S!

bosky jewels

yesterday’s bosky jewels

Umbrageous means “creating or providing shade”. You might have an umbrageous tree or tall friend. It can also describe somebody who is wont to take umbrage or offense. Your tall friend could be umbrageous in two senses.

Umbrageous entered English in the 1500s via French, originally from umbra, meaning “shade” in Latin, which does give a whole new authenticity to the recent expression of “throwing shade”. As someone who burns easily in the sunlight I wouldn’t take umbrage if someone threw shade at me.

This week’s word is actually bosky (pronunciation available here) because it sounds so quirky and I’d never happened upon it before. An area is described as bosky if it is covered by trees or bushes. Apparently in Middle English there were three ways to spell bush – bush, busk, and bosk. Busk is sometimes used in dialects, making me wonder if buskers originally serenaded passersby from a shrub. Bosk died out but not before giving us the root (pun intended) for the bosky adjective.

In spring, which is trying to surge in these parts, woodland flowers like snowdrops, crocus, and bluebells take advantage of the absent leaves in deciduous bosky areas to bloom without their umbrageous shade. Watch carefully when walking this week and you may be rewarded with glimpses of bosky jewels as I was yesterday.

Until next time happy reading, writing, and wordfooling.

Grace (@Wordfoolery)

p.s. Did you hear the news that Neil Gaiman is writing a sequel to “Neverwhere”? I’m smiling today.

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3 thoughts on “Bosky Jewels, Throwing Shade, and Taking Umbrage

  1. Rick Ellrod

    Interesting . . . In Georgette Heyer’s Regency novels, I believe “bosky” is also used as one of the numerous slang terms for “inebriated” — which makes a certain amount of sense: ‘lost in the bushes,’ maybe. šŸ™‚

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Boscaresque | The Wordfoolery Blog

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